Arrowheads, Spear-Points & Blades of Johnson Co., Iowa

Photographed for a private collector, these artifacts are a small selection of his collection. A limited edition of twenty 17″ x 22″ archival ink-jet prints are available for $150.00 each (plus S&H), with 20% going to the Bur Oak Land Trust for preservation and maintenance of natural areas for the enjoyment and education of the public in Johnson County, Iowa.

Native American artifacts from a private collection, all discovered in Johnson County, Iowa and representing approximately 10,000 years of stone tool making, photographed 10/12/2014

Native American artifacts from a private collection, all discovered in Johnson County, Iowa and representing approximately 10,000 years of stone tool making, photographed 10/12/2014

 

arrowheads

arrowhead collections

arrowhead collections

A friend of mine is an arrowhead collector and asked me to photograph this collection: 25 boxes, each representing a year from 1990-2011 plus several from earlier years. Most of the arrowheads were found in Iowa. We are planning to put together several “best of” collections and photograph them, experimenting with different backgrounds. Hope to have some fine art prints and posters ready for sale this fall.

Quetico, Spring, 2014

The annual spring canoe trip to Quetico Provincial Park May 27-June 3 has come and gone but here are some memories…

Mescalero Apache parfleche

Mescalero Apache parfleche envelope, circa 1875, L 24″ x W 11.5″, incised rawhide, pigment. Collected at Taos Pueblo. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, #3/5404. Photographed in 1992 in the Bronx storage facility, New York. These objects, “parfleche”, were made from stretched buffalo hide and designed and painted by native American women in tribes all over what is now the western US, a tradition of abstract painting predating the Europeans. Shot for the book American Indian Parfleche, A Tradition of Abstract Painting, written by Gaylord Torrance, Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City (4×5 Ektachrome).MescApacheF

Naniboujou

This is the Brule River at sunrise, entering Lake Superior on Naniboujou Beach after a stormy night in northern Minnesota in 2013.  The arc in the atmosphere is a “fogbow” or white rainbow (there is no color because the water droplets are so tiny). 13.5″ x 20″ limited edition of 10 on Epson Hot Press 330 gsm fine art paper.MAT1617C

3/13/2014 Migration

I woke up before sunrise this morning for some reason, still dark out, it looked cloudy, so I went back to bed, changed my mind and decided to head down to Cone Marsh in hopes of seeing the sunrise and some migrating waterfowl. It was a bit overcast and there was only a little open water far from road, but there were lots of geese (Canada, greater white-fronts and snow geese), a few trumpeter swans, pintails, scaup and wood ducks among other puddle ducks.  Red-winged black birds and red-bellied woodpeckers were squawking in the trees and amidst all the racket the distinctive “loud, resonant, musical rattle” of sandhill cranes across the ice.

Cone Marsh, Muscatine County, Iowa.

Cone Marsh, Muscatine County, Iowa.

Sunrise, geese, Cone Marsh.

Sunrise, geese, Cone Marsh.

 

Geese and ducks over ice, Cone Marsh.

Geese and ducks over ice, Cone Marsh.

"Snows & Blues", snow and blue geese, Cone Marsh.

“Snows & Blues”, snow and blue geese, Cone Marsh.

Skeins of snow geese, Cone Marsh.

Skeins of snow geese, Cone Marsh.

Greater white-front geese (Anser albifrons), Cone Marsh.

Greater white-front geese (Anser albifrons), Cone Marsh.

Sandhill cranes, Cone Marsh, Muscatine Co., Iowa.

Sandhill cranes, Cone Marsh, Muscatine Co., Iowa.

Sandhill crane and Canada geese, Cone Marsh.

Sandhill crane and Canada geese, Cone Marsh.

 

 

 

 

 

11/18/2013 Duck Hunting

I went duck-hunting last week with outdoor writer/photographer Joe Richard, arming myself with a Nikon, not a Remington 870 like Joe’s. Although I don’t hunt anymore I still love being on the marsh at sunrise with ducks in the air, and I was also interested in seeing just how cold a human being could get standing thigh-deep in water for four hours in Iowa in November (nothing a Thermos of hot tea and a hot shower afterwards didn’t cure). Although we were on the water, under the full moon, two hours before sunrise there were four boats ahead of us, so we got stuck a couple hundred yards off the flyway. We set up a burlap “hide” in the willows and Joe poled the boat away and hid it. Most of the ducks had been around for a while and seemed to know where the refuge boundary was but Joe coaxed a few into the decoys and shot a mallard and a green-wing teal for the freezer.  All images ©2013 Mark Tade, all rights reserved, no usage without prior written permission.

Poling in under a full moon and stars two hours before sunrise.

Poling in under a full moon and stars two hours before sunrise.

Joe Richard duck hunting 11/18/2013

Joe Richard duck hunting 11/18/2013

Joe Richard duck hunting 11/18/2013

Joe Richard duck hunting 11/18/2013

Joe Richard duck hunting 11/18/2013

Joe Richard duck hunting 11/18/2013

Joe Richard duck hunting 11/18/2013

Joe Richard duck hunting 11/18/2013